The music of the jazz greats – from Scott Joplin and Benny Goodman to Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock – is celebrated at four special shows this autumn at London’s St James Studio, located in St James Theatre, Palace Street, London W1. Hosted by JBGB Events, the ‘Wonderful Music of the Jazz Greats’ series follows the successful four Jazz Divas concerts presented earlier this year and will feature the music, stories and anecdotes of these jazz legends. The Wonderful Music of Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw is on Saturday 18 October featuring clarinetist Mark Crooks with guitarist Colin Oxley, pianist John Pearce, bassist Dave Chamberlain and drummer Matt Home.

Herbie Hancock’s music is honoured on 1 November with pianist Simon Browne’s Beyond Cantaloupe including trumpeter Fredie Gavita, saxophonist Kevin Flanagan, bassist Calum Gourlay and drummer Lewis Wright, while Scott Joplin and the Ragtime Masters is celebrated on 15 November by pianist and ragtime expert Keith Nichols with clarinetist Trevor Whiting and guitarist/banjoist Martin Wheatley. The series finishes with a triple-hit on 29 November when music of Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley is in the capable hands of pianist Chris Ingham’s Rebop, including trumpeter Paul Higgs, saxophonists Colin Watling and Kevin Flanagan, bassist Arnie Somogyi and drummer George Double.

– Jon Newey

For more details visit www.stjamestheatre.co.uk

carmen-lundy-new

Now an essential part of the capital’s jazz calendar, this year marks the fifth birthday of Georgia Mancio’s acclaimed ReVoice! Festival as it runs over 12 nights from 9-20 October. Kicking off this Thursday at its first regional concert at Watermill Jazz Club in Dorking with renowned UK vocalists Claire Martin and Joe Stilgoe (9 October), this year’s festival features the inimitable Carmen Lundy (pictured top), the dance-oriented duet of Vinx and Lee Payne, a film noir-inspired show from singer and actress Sandra Nkake, Christine Tobin, Claire Martin, Ian Shaw, Lianne Carroll and more.

It also extends beyond London for the first time, taking in Dorking’s Watermill Jazz Club and The Hunter Club in Bury St Edmunds while it concludes at the 606 Club in Chelsea. Mancio explained the reason to reach out beyond the festival’s usual Dean Street locale: “They’re about the people who run them and the people who go, and the fantastic atmosphere they create. They’re so up for listening and engaging, and they’re so warm – like a wave of energy you get back.”

Highlights this year also include US soul-jazz-looping singer/percussionist Vinx and English tap dancer Lee Payne with their Hands, Mouth & Feet show, striking French/Cameroonian singer songwriter Sandra Nkake, and a rare four shows over two club nights from Grammy-winning US star Carmen Lundy backed by a trio led by revered keyboardist Patrice Rushen.

Georgia-MancioAs well as curating the event Mancio (left) performs each night on the opening set and has lined up another ambitious series of collaborations as she performs each night with the likes of Andrew McCormack, Tom Cawley, Michael Janisch and Gareth Lockrane among others.

The festival continues at Pizza Express Jazz Club in Soho for nine-nights with a double bill each night topped by: Rebecca Parris (10-11 Oct); Diana Torto/John Taylor/Julian Siegel (12 Oct); Liane Carroll/Ian Shaw/Georgia Mancio (13 Oct); Christine Tobin’s Deep Song (14 Oct); Vinx/Lee Payne (15 Oct); Sandra Nkake’s Shadow Of A Doubt (16 Oct); and Carmen Lundy with Patrice Rushen Trio (17-18 Oct).

The event then closes out over two nights with Belgian-born singer Gabrielle Ducomble at the Hunter Club, Bury St Edmunds (19 Oct) and then a trio of Georgia Mancio, Sara Colman and Randolph Matthews at the 606 Club, Chelsea (20 Oct).

Of all the international artists that Georgia has programmed at ReVoice!, two in particular have stood out. “Jhelisa Anderson, because her performance skills were so immense. Something in me changed because of seeing her - she made me feel braver. She and Beady Belle, or Beate (Lech), both have it – they’re just so brave on stage, so totally immersed in the music, but in such an honest way. They’re both fantastic singers, but I think it was as much the performance. Everything was so well executed but it didn’t seem contrived in any way. The other thing about Beate were the levels, the gears that she had. I don’t think I’ve seen anyone do that – she just kept pulling out more and more expertise. We all talk about jazz and why there is not more of an audience for it. Well, I think that’s a lot to do with it, the performance – the way it’s presented and the way you put it across with confidence and really believe in it.”

– Peter Quinn and Mike Flynn

For more info and tickets go to www.revoicefestival.com

jared-lawson

Two sold-out nights at an iconic British venue for an American artist, who barely six months ago, was a complete unknown says many things about the geo-commercial mechanics of the modern music industry. Firstly, as the Portland, Oregon vocalist-pianist Jarrod Lawson acknowledges, the support lent to him by media and audiences in London has been a significant factor in the upswing of his fortunes. Secondly, the act of putting music on iTunes can pay dividends in the long term. Thirdly, real talent will out. With the deafening buzz surrounding these gigs and the imminent release of Lawson’s eponymous debut album, he has to show and prove, and he does so and then some, pretty much from the downbeat.

The string of tracks from the album – ‘Music And Its Magical Way’, ‘Sleepwalkers’, ‘Together We’ll Stand’ and ‘Everything I Need’ – match if not top the beauty of the studio performance, and the heavily jazz-inflected soul, with myriad chord changes, shifts of tempo and melodic richness, has the audience on-side in no uncertain terms. Executed by a very able band [drums, bass, guitar, two backing vocalists] augmented by the impressive flugelhorn player Farnell Newton, the music comes alive by way of Lawson’s precise, well-measured lead vocal, which often works the falsetto range without cheap tricks and harmonises excellently with the other singers.

With refreshing honesty, Lawson name-checks Donny Hathaway, which makes perfect sense given the blend of intricacy and emotion in his material but the other legends that spring to mind are George Duke, for the piquant Afro-Brazilian rhythms, and Don Blackman, for the combination of subtlety and earthiness in the song structures. The use of the lower reaches of Newton’s horn as an effective counterweight to the high flutter of the vocals is an artistic choice that Blackman himself may have appreciated, but if Lawson fits neatly into this historical lineage then more recent references are also appropriate.

Some of the more ecstatic, edgy unison vocals recall a certain Lewis Taylor while the beauty of the writing makes a Frank McComb comparison also inevitable. In fact, Lawson was actually asked to fill in for the latter on a Capital Jazz cruise gig a few years ago, and given the fact that McComb, and Taylor, for that matter, have been maddeningly AWOL it goes without saying that the new singer on the block appears to be filling something of a gap. Talking of which, Lawson does one sole cover: ‘One Mo Gin’ by none other than D’Angelo. What price a D’Jarrodlo duet if the sugar man ever brings his voodoo back?

– Kevin Le Gendre

See the live stream of the gig below:

After the months of work that went into arranging charts, assembling musicians and arduously sourcing outmoded sounds to recapture the cold, ambient textures that underpinned David Bowie's Low and 'Heroes' LPs of '77, Dylan Howe's resulting, swing-licked Subterranean - New Designs On Bowie's Berlin album was a five-star success. Even Bowie himself went as far as to crawl out of hibernation to commend the drummer's efforts, deeming the record “top notch”. Then Howe pushed the panic button by booking a tour to road-test his raw, yet meticulously multi-layered record live, and the punishing work schedule resumed.

But here, all those rehearsals later, in an appropriately-arty venue, on a dim-lit stage, against a huge screen showing scratched-up visuals of '70s Berlin, tonight's band rolled out the record with ease. From the opening bars of the album's ghostly title track, Howe's faint, but fidgety swing feel appeared almost wired to a restless hook from double bassist Dave Whitford, leaving pianist Ross Stanley to plant gentle chords in the spaces unoccupied by Steve Lodder's sci-fi-style synth work.

Completing this A-list line-up for this Kings Place appearance, saxophonist Andy Sheppard played magnificently, slouched back into the dense, dry ambience on stage, concocting soft, scribbley lines away from the mic, or leaning in to max out melody lines with Stanley. A drum break-built ‘Weeping Wall’ (which was dramatically complimented with old, bleached clips of the Berlin wall behind the band), was trailed by a ruthless arrangement of Bowie rarity ‘All Saints’, throwing the band into a full-pelt swing out. With Stanley, Sheppard and Howe now firing on all cylinders, the piece could have passed for a passage from Coltrane's ‘Resolution’, had it not been for the some electrifying, laser-guided synth gymnastics from Lodder that prog-star Rick Wakeman would have approved of.

As the screen flickered and flipped to fuzzy films of German military camps, checkpoints and car factories, another frantic ride cymbal pattern sprung ‘Neukoln (Night)’ to life. Soon growling with low, strummed bass, the tune's dark, descending theme - a mess of soprano sax, strident piano and a ghostly, sustained celeste-style synth sound - swirled around the room.

Later, the familiar strains of ‘Art Decade’ and ‘Warsawa’ stirred real excitement amongst the Bowie nuts, the latter launched by Howe executing strong timpani-style tom rolls with mallets and Whitford clung to a single-note drone. Sheppard approached the bleak, repetitive melody here with long breathy lines against the flutter of brushes, presenting Stanley with a runway in which to slowly build what could have been the solo of the night.

By the time Lodder ushered in ‘Moss Garden’ mimicking the original with samples of running water and koto, the whole hall was hypnotised. This trance-like state from the off could account for some great solos tonight drifting by without applause, which for a typical jazz gig would appear atypical. But this was no standard jazz show. This was Howe's live eulogy to Bowie, his moment of glory, a great reading of a real rock standard, rolled out with such ease and conviction it should be seen to be believed. By both jazz heads and Bowie buffs alike.

– Mark Youll (review and photo)

Young drummer Moses Boyd (pictured above) and veteran bassist Dave Green have been announced as the winners of this year’s Worshipful Company of Musicians’ Jazz Awards following a ceremony and performance at the Pizza Express Jazz Club in London’s Soho on Sunday 21 September. Green became the first bassist to win the company's Medal for Lifetime Achievement, while Boyd scooped the coveted 2014 Young Jazz Musician Award. The drummer performed two sets of music alongside five other finalists; alto saxophonist Phil Meadows, trombonist Tom Green, tenor player Nadim Teimoori (who also made it to the finals in 2013), pianist Sam James and bassist Misha Mullov-Abbado, and was awarded the prize following a vote by the journalists, educators and paying members of the public who made up the audience.

The repertoire comprised classic standards, selected before the concert by the performers, along with arrangements and original compositions. The shortlist for this year’s final was drawn up by a panel of 12 judges, including musicians Tina May, Mark Armstrong and Tim Garland (winners of the Young Jazz Musician Award in 1992, 1996 and 1997 respectively), broadcaster Julian Joseph, educators Martin Hathaway, Nick Smart, Scott Stroman and Simon Purcell, and former Jazzwise columnist the late Jack Massarik. Boyd joins an exclusive list of former winners, among them pianist John Escreet, vibes player Jim Hart, bassist Mike Janisch and trumpeter Laura Jurd; while Dave Green follows in the footsteps of greats such as Kenny Wheeler, John Taylor, Sir John Dankworth, Stan Tracey and last year’s winner Digby Fairweather.

One of the livery companies of the City of London, the Worshipful Company of Musicians supports and encourages professional musical performance by working with musical trades and funding the education and promotion of young players.

– Thomas Rees

For more information on the WCOM and its annual jazz awards www.wcom.org.uk

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website

If you do not change browser settings, you consent to continue. Learn more

I understand

Breaking News

Beats & Pieces Big Band launch Ten with video and tour

Beats & Pieces Big Band launch Ten w…

Manchester's mighty Beats & Pieces Big Band continue their yearlong...

Read More.....
Robert Glasper leads R+R=NOW for stormy Celebrate Brooklyn blow-out

Robert Glasper leads R+R=NOW for stormy …

The history of collectives in jazz are nearly as old...

Read More.....
Are you ready for the Write Stuff? 2018 Applications Now Open

Are you ready for the Write Stuff? 2018 …

Budding music writers listen up! This year's Write Stuff music...

Read More.....
John Coltrane’s The Lost Album: Both Directions at Once hits Top 20 Albums

John Coltrane’s The Lost Album: Both Dir…

Last week's release of John Coltrane's The Lost Album: Both...

Read More.....
Boogie at the Bandstand - Love Supreme's festival within a festival

Boogie at the Bandstand - Love Supreme's…

With an abundance of big names on the larger stages...

Read More.....
Keyon Harrold, Vijay Iyer and EXPO Commissions for 40th Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Fest

Keyon Harrold, Vijay Iyer and EXPO Commi…

The 40th edition of the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival...

Read More.....
Roy Carr 1945 – 2018

Roy Carr 1945 – 2018

Doyen of the music press for half a century and...

Read More.....
Pharoah's Prophecies Pave Way For New Wave Of Spiritual Sentinels At This Year's Love Supreme

Pharoah's Prophecies Pave Way For New Wa…

"I've already had my mind blown once today," a geezerish...

Read More.....
Meshell Ndegeocello and The Bad Plus for Innervisions Fest at Under The Bridge

Meshell Ndegeocello and The Bad Plus for…

Chelsea music venue, Under the Bridge, will play host to...

Read More.....
Brockley Beer & Improv Sessions Brew Up New Series

Brockley Beer & Improv Sessions Brew…

Connoisseurs of craft ales and well-crafted extemporisation, rejoice! Another series of...

Read More.....
Archie Shepp, Phronesis, Kandace Springs and Kit Downes added to EFG London Jazz Festival

Archie Shepp, Phronesis, Kandace Springs…

The line-up for this year's EFG London Jazz Festival, which...

Read More.....
Wynton Marsalis Quartet open up to the spirit of Ornette at Barbican

Wynton Marsalis Quartet open up to the s…

Wynton Marsalis is more forward-thinking than he gets credit for...

Read More.....
Joe Lovano and Dave Douglas step up with Sound Prints at the Village vanguard

Joe Lovano and Dave Douglas step up with…

Joe Lovano remarked that "it was the end of an...

Read More.....
Jazz Women celebrated at Jazz Centre UK exhibition

Jazz Women celebrated at Jazz Centre UK …

Southend-on-Sea's Jazz Centre UK presents a major exhibition, Jazz Women...

Read More.....
Boggamasta boogie on down at Brussels Jazz Weekend

Boggamasta boogie on down at Brussels Ja…

The UK equivalent to the Brussels Jazz Weekend would be...

Read More.....
Orphy Robinson gets Gibraltar rocking beyond Borders

Orphy Robinson gets Gibraltar rocking be…

British vibes virtuoso Orphy Robinson is artist-in-residence at the year's...

Read More.....
Vijay Iyer Sextet and Julian Lage jive to Jazz Cafe

Vijay Iyer Sextet and Julian Lage jive t…

Having reopened its doors in January 2016, following a multi-million-pound...

Read More.....
Jon Hiseman 1944-2018

Jon Hiseman 1944-2018

One of the UK's foremost drummers and bandleaders, Jon Hiseman...

Read More.....
Airto Moreira's Afro-Samba Anthems Raise Roof At Ronnie's

Airto Moreira's Afro-Samba Anthems Raise…

  No greater sign of changing times comes than in this...

Read More.....
Ayanna Witter-Johnson and Binker & Moses head to Harrogate

Ayanna Witter-Johnson and Binker & M…

The Harrogate International Festival, which has been running for over...

Read More.....
Voting Now Open for 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

Voting Now Open for 2018 Parliamentary J…

Voting is now open for the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards...

Read More.....
Lost John Coltrane Quartet Album surfaces on Impulse!

Lost John Coltrane Quartet Album surface…

A previously unreleased session by the classic John Coltrane Quartet...

Read More.....
Etienne Charles Triumphant At The Tabernacle With Timely Blend Of Defiance And Celebration

Etienne Charles Triumphant At The Tabern…

  This venue has deep historical resonance for black music in...

Read More.....
Jean Toussaint All-Star 6Tet Shine Bright At Ronnie Scott's

Jean Toussaint All-Star 6Tet Shine Brigh…

  'All-star' is a term mostly out of fashion these days...

Read More.....
Horn Doyenne Holsen Hones Minimalist Drones For Hubro Album Launch

Horn Doyenne Holsen Hones Minimalist Dro…

The Norwegian brass-band tradition, which first evolved in that country...

Read More.....
Vandermark and Nilssen-Love Blow Down Brighton's Green Door

Vandermark and Nilssen-Love Blow Down Br…

  The streets of Brighton have been overflowing with music fans...

Read More.....
Tully Takes The Prize To Ronnie's

Tully Takes The Prize To Ronnie's

  What better way to celebrate the conferring of an honour...

Read More.....
Rebirth Of The Cool: Shabaka Hutchings, Thundercat and Nubya Garcia lead a jazz takeover at Field Day

Rebirth Of The Cool: Shabaka Hutchings, …

  After years of going to jazz gigs and being the...

Read More.....
Anthony Braxton's ZIM Sextet go exploring at Cafe OTO

Anthony Braxton's ZIM Sextet go explorin…

  With the death of Cecil Taylor a few weeks ago...

Read More.....
New British Jazz Generation Blasts Bath With Spiritual Baptism

New British Jazz Generation Blasts Bath …

Bath Festival applied radical surgery to their roster of festivals in...

Read More.....
PYJAEN Prosper At Peckham's Ghost Notes

PYJAEN Prosper At Peckham's Ghost Notes

Catching bands at the beginning of their journeys is so often...

Read More.....
Sons of Kemet, Ashley Henry and Yussef Dayes groove at the Great Escape

Sons of Kemet, Ashley Henry and Yussef D…

Since its beginnings in 2006, Brighton's festival of new music...

Read More.....
Zara McFarlane and Jazzmeia Horn among highlights at St Lucia Jazz Fest

Zara McFarlane and Jazzmeia Horn among h…

In recent times this event has had a tenuous relationship...

Read More.....
Rainforest Reveries: Crawford and Simcock In Arboreal Praise For Powys As Birdsongs Take Flight At Hampstead Arts Fest

Rainforest Reveries: Crawford and Simcoc…

Released last month on Basho Records, Birdsong/Cân yr Adar fuses...

Read More.....
Claire Martin, The Printmakers and Jamie Cullum line-up for 606 Club 30 years at Lots Road Festival

Claire Martin, The Printmakers and Jamie…

Chelsea's salubrious jazz den, the 606 Club, is to mark...

Read More.....
Collective X line-up for Love & Protest at Stratford Circus

Collective X line-up for Love & Prot…

Genre-defying London-based group Collective X, led by singer Alya Al...

Read More.....


Subcribe To Jazzwise

Advertisement

Call 0800 137201 to subscribe or click here to email the subscriptions team

Get in touch

Jazzwise Magazine,
St. Judes Church,
Dulwich Road, 
Herne Hill,
London, SE24 0PD.

0208 677 0012

Latest Tweets

RT @beatsnpieces: Thanks @Jazzwise for premiering another track from our new 10th anniversary CD/DVD ’ten’ - this video is our recent singl…
Follow Us - @Jazzwise
@hhhhhennies Aeolian String Ensemble
Follow Us - @Jazzwise

Newsletter

© 2016 MA Business & Leisure Ltd registered in England and Wales number 02923699 Registered office: Jesses Farm, Snow Hill, Dinton, Salisbury, SP3 5HN . Designed By SE24 MEDIA