This exciting initiative taken by London-based vocalist Filomena Campus is the best possible advert for cross-cultural exchange at a time of internal strife in Europe. Billed as 'Alghero incontra Londra' the meeting of musicians from the enchantingly beautiful Sardinian city of Alghero and the dizzying metropolis that is London produces a pleasing contrast of styles as well as proof of the value of spontaneous collaboration. Staged at Poco Loco, a well-appointed restaurant with a spacious stage and good acoustics the double bill presents local players, bassist Salvatore Maltana and guitarist Marcello Peghin as well as British visitors, Black Top, aka pianist Pat Thomas and vibraphonist Orphy Robinson. The two duos are ably representative of their respective heartlands. Each has its own take on a wide range of traditions.

IMG 0055-2

Maltana and Peghin (above) are players upholding a long lineage of European musicians who embrace improvisation while referencing a folk heritage that is rich to say the least. Having said that both the jazz and western pop culture of these musicians is anything but superficial and Peghin's affinity to the work of Wayne Shorter and Neil Young makes him an artist with a substantial stylistic well from which to draw. His touch is assured and his alternation of bulbous, resonant chords, enhanced by a broad necked 10-string guitar, and fleet, serpentine single note lines brings a fair amount of detail to the table. Maltana's upright bass is perhaps a touch underpowered at first but soon settles info fruitful dialogue with Peghin in which melodies are clearly articulated and solos bring out the woody timbres of the two acoustic instruments.

Much anticipation greets Black Top primarily because it is a largely unknown quantity in Sardinia, and Thomas and Robinson's setup – synthesizers and iPads as well as piano and vibraphone make it clear that the musicians will be delving into electronics and quotidian sound as well as lending themselves to on-the-spot creativity. There are a few stares of bemusement at the first part of the performance as Robinson triggers myriad spoken word samples and effects and the music takes shape slowly from a series of atmospheric soundscapes that snap and crackle away, conjuring up the sense of a radio show in which voices spark into life at unpredictable junctures. Organically, arrangements dip and swerve but when Robinson takes a ferocious fizzing vibes solo there is a release of tension from the audience as it finally recognizes something that might be called jazz, or the virtuosity synonymous with it.

IMG 0110-2

As abstract as the music is a great amount of groove drops in and out of earshot, pushing the music into the African-Caribbean rhythmic waters beholden to the identity of the group, and making it clear that the avant-garde with which Thomas and Robinson are largely associated has always engaged with populism since the days of Ornette Coleman and Thelonious Monk's sprightly forays into calypso. The audience warms further to the theme but there are still a few raised eyebrows over the fact that Black Top pumps up the volume in a way that may be alien to most patrons in a seated venue. It's a fascinating spectacle to see some heads, acclimatising to the extra decibels, starting to nod as the raucous riffing of which both the players are more than capable, takes a hold. If there were any resistance to some of the harder edges of Black Top's sound then, as Campus (above with Robinson) herself stated, that was no bad thing, given that challenging as well as engaging audiences is an essential part of her remit. When all four musicians come together to play a short set at the end of the evening there is also a degree of wrestling with ideas as they search for common ground, with the digital beats eliciting a tougher modal attack from Maltana and strident rhythm work from Peghin. The novel quartet finds a vamp and then twists it into more staggered time before dissolving into a shower of haunting sounds. The encounter is a bracing one, and the presence of several local musicians and dignitaries such as mayor Mario Bruno reflects the importance of the project.

Luckily for British audiences the circle will be complete when the Sardinians come to London in November for two nights at Soho's Pizza Express Jazz Club where they will be joined by Black Top and several other notable guests such as Cleveland Watkiss, Rod Youngs, Steve Lodder and Marta Capponi.

– Kevin Le Gendre

– Photos by Carl Hyde

Filomena Campus' Theatralia Jazz Festival takes place on 13-14 November at Pizza Express Jazz Club, Dean street, Soho, London, W1D 3RW - for more info visit www.pizzaexpresslive.com

JeanToussaint LWorms 3

Jazz In The Round promoters Chris Phillips and Jez Nelson must have scoured the South in their search for suitably-shaped venues to accommodate their expanding vision; St Mary's In The Rock, a semi-circular Regency church hollowed out of the Hastings cliffs, fits the bill perfectly as a setting for this festival celebrating emerging UK jazz. There's a respectful and attentive crowd of native Hastings bohos and down-from-London types, a live artist capturing the event in acrylic and canvas, and the customary earnestly pedagogical introduction from Phillips and Nelson, as the Arthur O'Hara Trio kick off proceedings. Their stripped-back sound is energetic and angular, but with a firm grip on melody – edging close to post-rock thanks to O'Hara's retro sounding Precision bass, forceful melodic riffing, and an overall sense of what one might call exultant melancholy common to the genre. Chelsea Carmichael's tenor sax is full-voiced and accurate, and her control of dynamics sets the pace. The tunes are spacious and deceptively simple, but the bare bones reveal a carefully assembled framework on which the trio hang compositions that are ambitious in emotional scope. 'Oasis' lets drummer Ed Harley demonstrate his chops, and builds up a real head of steam.

Tim Doyle, aka Chiminyo, follows with a solo performance combining junglist drumming with triggered electronics to create a one-man rave. His ingeniously programmed, dub-step flavoured compositions also show off his more-than-decent skills as a drummer and draw warm applause and even spontaneous outbreaks of dancing.

Elder statesman Jean Toussaint is here with a band of young proteges, recounting his own experience as a tyro of Art Blakey – "We learned by doing – if you make a mistake, make it loud, and you won't do it again!" he recalls. The acoustic of the room magnifies his already enormous sound, now burnished into a deep, glorious purr, as Daniel Casimir on bass and Ben Brown on drums set up a pulsing ostinato that shifts gear into a magisterial modal workout. Mark Kavuma (pictured above, with Toussaint) on trumpet looks impossibly, cartoonishly hip in his stylish threads, his tone brassy and declamatory enough to match the leader's own. 'Vera Cruz', by Milton Nascimento via Wayne Shorter, features a smouldering solo by Kavuma – if Toussaint's playing contains elements of Shorter's, there are surely echoes of early 1970s Miles in the way Kavuma spits out shreds of sound and long, slashing notes that cut into the silence as Brown brings the drums to a polyrhythmic simmer. Toussaint takes the band up to the mountaintop and gently back down again.

There are features for pianist Albert Palau, with a fast-paced seven-count rendition of 'Beatrice' demonstrating his seamless incorporation of language from the contemporary classical repertoire and awesome lightness of touch, and Casimir has a wonderfully creative solo on ''Round Midnight', before Toussaint leads the band into a joyous closing vamp that causes further outbreaks of dancing. Jazz In The Round are leading the charge of new British jazz; tonight's wonderfully eclectic, uniformly excellent bill outlines their vision; this festival is richly deserving of everyone's support and should surely return next year.

Eddie Myer
– Photo by Lisa Wormsley 

This year's festival was perhaps short on surprises, compared to previous editions, but was high in quality. The energetic mainstream was amply taken care of in a closing double-bill of the Limerick Jazz Quintet with vocalist Aoife Doyle and Jim Doherty's Tenor Madness quintet. The veteran pianist had paired the reliably exciting saxophones of Richie Buckley and Brendan Doyle but, unlike many two-tenor blowouts, his arrangements paid attention to dynamics and endings. On paper, much of the programming was a case of former festival heroes returning in a new guise.

Julian Siegel (below), here for the first time fronting his own quartet, impressed with his vast expertise on tenor, soprano and contrabass-clarinet, matched by the ridiculously inventive Liam Noble on piano. The original material from their recent album Vista was augmented by tricky adaptations of Bud Powell and Cedar Walton, and proved that super-clever doesn't rule out super-communication.

julian-limerick

Listeners in Ireland are speculating that, after next March, British musicians may well need visas to perform in the Republic, so it's gratifying that this year there was a good UK representation. Northern Ireland's Linley Hamilton floated his versatile trumpet on a pad of eight Dublin string players plus a Limerick rhythm-section, directed by arranger-pianist Cian Boylan, with brief contributions by singer Jess Kavanagh.

Cork-based trombonist Paul Dunlea appeared with an Anglo-Scottish sextet including trumpeter Ryan Quigley and drummer Alyn Cosker, doing new music due to be recorded the following day. Dunlea's themes and often unconventional writing (sometimes pairing trombone and electric bass) are compelling but it was the energy of this debut performance that triumphed, thanks also to Paul Booth (tenor), Eoin Walsh (bass) and Steve Hamilton (piano). On the other hand, Renegade Brass (top) from Sheffield had their bass drum miked soooo loud as to render almost inaudible much of the brass and the turntablist, and their rapper. But they certainly got the Saturday night punters dancing to the beat.

– Brian Priestley

– Photos by Salvatore Conte

YusefDayes-9

The bouncer outside is busy checking ID and handing out wristbands to those lucky enough and old enough to buy booze legally; inside the system is playing trap to entertain the packed out crowd. The keys and bass players appear first and, after a short delay occasioned by PA malfunction, start up an ambient drone; then Yussef Dayes stalks onstage like a star. He doesn't acknowledge the crowd – they respond with cheers and whoops as he picks up a vibraslap and disperses some vibes through the overheads; then he smashes straight into one of his trademark chattering beats, had swaying and locks flying; it looks as though some powerful current is forcing itself up through his torso and out through his fluorescent drumsticks, flickering like lightning between snare and hats as they build up to a tense head of kinetic energy that gets released into massive tom fills like explosive thunderclaps. Yohan Kebede's Fender Rhodes is reverbed and delayed into an ambient wash, an upper register of tinkling ripples reminiscent of Lonnie Liston Smith in the blissed-out 1970s – Rocco Palladino on bass is loud and heavy through an octaver, dropping long notes to help shape the sound. The beat breaks down, fades away, then comes back, even more hyped; then it's over. "We're here freestlying," says Dayes, and that's exactly what they proceed to do.

The basic template harks back to the glory days of what used to be called intelligent drum'n'bass – chiming keys sketch out ambiguous chords over stuttering beats and heavy bass bombs, like old school Photek or Roni Size jams; there are hints of familiar riffs, rolling waves of builds and drops and the occasional false start; a flat-footed take on Lenny White's 'Sorcerer' is rescued as Dayes' sheer chutzpah drives the band ever onwards, never looking back. Dropping the beat out to come back harder and heavier is his ace card and he plays it to full effect; his co-musicians steer clear of jazz-funk licks, and the invisible hand of the soundman adds effects in a dub style.

The vibe is like a high-energy warehouse party jam – an impression that the occasional PA drop-outs only heighten, all the more so when a nattily attired special guest, introduced as Rob JR, takes to the mic and sings, screams and hollers like a punk MC. The crowd call them back for an encore that turns into another long-form workout; then everyone piles outside to smoke in the adjoining bus station car park. Dayes is an unpredictable phenomenon, and the music feels like a work in progress, but this crowd are with him every inch of the way.

Eddie Myer

Anya Arnold

Most jazz cruises skim through moist Caribbean parts, proffering smooth American sedatives, but Finland can offer a somewhat contrasting adventure. Turku is the country's oldest city, nestled at the mouth of the Aura River, to the west of Helsinki. Its prime promoter is Flame Jazz, powered by the keyboardist Jussi Fredriksson, and twice a year they run a 24-hour cruise from Turku to Stockholm and back. The Flame Jazz Cruise has been expanding, and this 13th edition was sold out, at a 2000 capacity.

The musicians literally have an hour to load onto the Viking Grace ocean skyscraper, set up their gear and soundcheck. Then two stages alternate for the evening session, returning the next day for a 1pm afternoon run. The Saturday nightfall sequence involved a complete blackout, the sense of an actual cruise motion was dulled, so smooth-running was the boat, so dark the window surround. The Sunday programme took on a completely different character, with splendid views of the Finnish and Swedish coasts. Saturday was drinking party funk nite, while Sunday streamed into zones of avant accessibility and ambient improvisation.

Playing last on the Saturday, the Helsinki-Cotonou Ensemble unified Finnish funk and pan-African styles, including Congolese soukous and Afro-beat, even though their singer/percussionist/tenorman co-leader Noël Saïzonou is from Benin. Their line-up boasted a roughhouse baritone saxophone, and frequent rocked-up guitar solos from the other main dude, Janne Halonen. Their glitzy, bombastic sound was well-suited to the full dancefloor of enthusiastic post-midnighters, climaxing with a percussion duel and an Afro-latin flavour, including frantic call-and-response vocals.

Matti-Komulainen

The six-piece Gourmet (above) have been together for around a decade, fronted by saxophonist Mikko Innanen, who is usually known for his extreme blurting control. This band has a line-up well suited to pastiche, embracing areas of Balkan, free jazz, surf rock, German cabaret and New York klezmer, with trombone, tuba, accordion and a liberally twanging electric guitar. Suitably, they played in the Retro Bar. Innanen switched between alto saxophone and a needlepoint sopranino, striking suddenly with several extreme solos, delivered with a savage high-note precision. Gourmet would then jar back into a tightly manoeuvred, boozy complexity, or a brisk trad trot. They achieved the rarely achieved aim of being appealing to a wide audience, while slipping in repeated backstabs to the expected. Trombonist Ilmari Pohjola had a sideline in avian whistling, whilst accordionist Veli Kujala added to his vocabulary by violently bouncing his instrument on his knee, as Innanen stole away his music stand at a crucial moment. 'What Can We Do When The Sky Falls Down' was suited for a Wes Anderson caper scene, segueing into a drift of fatalist melancholy cheer, then returning to a madcap acceleration. There was a post-Zorn/Morricone cowboy interlude, and a solo tuba splurt, as Petri Keskitalo appeared to be verbalising a text that was spread across his music stand. The horns came back for a free alto-'bone scrapple over a supposed superhero theme toon, the Gourmet sound consistently reeling with gluttonous genre appropriation.

Following soon after, in the much larger Vogue room, the duo of trumpeter Verneri Pohjola and percussionist Mika Kallio (pictured top) played music from the recent Animal Image album on Edition Records. This demanded a complete calming down of the crowd, into an attentive, quietened state, a condition that was soon found by the vast majority. Acting as a communal ritual, following long hours of quaffing and gobbling, the sparse sounds were accompanied by a film backdrop, sometimes featuring suitably oceanic scenes. Your scribe found himself with the ultimate vantage point, watching live players and images from the side of the room, just below a pixel-rupturing video screen, where close details could be caught. Then he could rotate on his swivel chair to gaze at the real life ocean panorama of small islands with their looming electricity-generating windmills. Pohjola's effects pedals further enlarged the language, whilst Kallio laid out his impressive collection of gongs and prayer bowls, making deep resonances grow out of his tiers of vari-sized cymbals. Around half way through, the pair began to construct a rhythmic momentum, peppered with hot-oil trumpet, and the ringing of bigger bells, woodblocks and foot-pedals assisting our collective glide through this seductive dream archipelago.

Martin Longley
Photos by Matti Komulainen

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website

If you do not change browser settings, you consent to continue. Learn more

I understand

Breaking News

Mehldau Marvels At Jazztopad

  The entire spectrum can dazzle at Jazztopad, a Polish festival in...

Read More.....

Jazz FM Awards return for 2019

The Jazz FM Awards return for a sixth time next...

Read More.....

Chick Corea, Madeleine Peyroux and Kamaa…

The organisers of the Love Supreme Jazz Festival, which runs...

Read More.....

Peter Boizot 1929 – 2018

The press obituaries for Peter Boizot, who has died aged...

Read More.....

David Mossman – 17 July 1942 - 8 Decembe…

Ahead of starting the Vortex in 1988, there is nothing...

Read More.....

Greg Fox and Pulverize The Sound punish …

  The second phase of Poland’s Jazz Jantar festival involved five nights...

Read More.....

Astral Progression Ensemble and Irrevers…

  Jazz Jantar has been running in the northern Polish port...

Read More.....

Tippett & Bourne, Liane Carroll and…

The Bristol Jazz & Blues Festival will return for its...

Read More.....

Jessica Radcliffe poised an poetic for R…

In this centenary year of the end of the First...

Read More.....

Iridescent Ibrahim Leads Multi-Horn Boon…

The Barbican's foyer is still resounding to the tumultuous multi-horned...

Read More.....

Maisha raise Afro-futurist spirits at Gh…

Scrolling down the posts on Facebook, from people pleading for...

Read More.....

John McLaughlin and 4th Dimension Back F…

Legendary jazz-rock guitarist John McLaughlin has just announced a return...

Read More.....

Dave Douglas Supergroup Dazzles Among Ho…

  Guimarães is Portugal’s birthplace. Surrounded by verdant hills, this quiet...

Read More.....

Bill Laurance Goes Big At Southbank With…

  At certain moments during this concert, Bill Laurance looks like...

Read More.....

Trans-Atlantic Team-Up: Chicago X London…

Much has been written about the jazz scene that has...

Read More.....

Dalston Devils: Branch and Brandon Lewis…

The Vortex and Cafe OTO are separated by a few...

Read More.....

Mike and Leni Stern light up Ronnie Scot…

What an unexpected pleasure to see Mike Stern exchanging guitar...

Read More.....

22-year-old saxophonist Xhosa Cole wins …

Saxophonist Xhosa Cole has been announced as the winner of...

Read More.....

Braxton and Marclay Broker New Sonic Exp…

  The UK premiere of Anthony Braxton's 'Composition No 103' (1983)...

Read More.....

Delay-gratification – Bill Frisell’s spe…

Bill Frisell isn't much of a talker. The music is...

Read More.....

Snarky Puppy, Jamie Cullum and Gladys Kn…

The first artists have been revealed for next year's Love...

Read More.....

Archie Shepp’s Art Songs & Spiritual…

This evening gets off to a flying start with Simon...

Read More.....

Gregory Porter, Joshua Redman, The Bad P…

The first names have been revealed for next year's Cheltenham...

Read More.....

Billy Harper charges up Church Of Sound

A house of praise is the perfect setting for one...

Read More.....

Ezra Collective Get Sweaty And Prophetic…

  "This is about joy and happiness and celebrating everything that's...

Read More.....

GoGo Penguin: Kings Of The Bill Take Fli…

  The Concorde usually hosts mid-ranking rock bands or popular club...

Read More.....

Helena Kay’s KIM Trio launch Moon Palace…

Fast emerging saxophonist Helena Kay is set to release her...

Read More.....

Ben LaMar Gay Breaks Back Of Chicagoan P…

A wet afternoon in the 'Big Smoke' is brightened by...

Read More.....

Shepp Sharp, Fiery and Free at Enjoy Fes…

The Enjoy Jazz festival is currently celebrating its 20th anniversary...

Read More.....

Baker On A Roll As Her Eden Project Pays…

  Lorraine Baker recorded one of the season's freshest sounding releases...

Read More.....

Freestage Stars Ready To Fire Up EFG Lon…

With the full programme confirmed for this year's EFG London...

Read More.....

Sons of Kemet: Kinetic and Chaotic at Ko…

There is already a sense of excitement in the air...

Read More.....

Henri Texier, Denys Baptiste, Ghost Note…

The 37th edition of what is a key date on...

Read More.....

Dave Holland's Aziza Up The Ante At Ronn…

The old joke that the audience will have a chance...

Read More.....

Art Ensemble and Mary Halvorson among th…

The English music critic Richard Williams finished his three-year stint...

Read More.....

A Melting Pot Of Sounds – Pelin Opcin ta…

Alyn Shipton spoke to Pelin Opcin, the EFG London Jazz...

Read More.....


Subcribe To Jazzwise

Advertisement

Call 0800 137201 to subscribe or click here to email the subscriptions team

Get in touch

Jazzwise Magazine,
St. Judes Church,
Dulwich Road, 
Herne Hill,
London, SE24 0PD.

0208 677 0012

Latest Tweets

In the Round is an annual series of intimate performances at the @RoundhouseLDN that sees the venue transformed wit… https://t.co/aakTUMvohk
Follow Us - @Jazzwise
Mehldau Marvels At Jazztopad https://t.co/5dh463wBww @Jazztopad @bradmehldau @NonesuchRecords @EspeSpalding… https://t.co/YN3S9PBGRJ
Follow Us - @Jazzwise

Newsletter

© 2016 MA Business & Leisure Ltd registered in England and Wales number 02923699 Registered office: Jesses Farm, Snow Hill, Dinton, Salisbury, SP3 5HN . Designed By SE24 MEDIA