The line-up for next year's Gateshead International Jazz Festival, which runs from 6 - 8 April 2018, has been announced and brings together strong mix of grand masters and rising stars performing across four stages, all under the roof of the iconic Sage venue. Things kick off with a triple bill topped by veteran space-jazz travellers Sun Ra Arkestra, who still featuring the astonishingly vital 93-year old Marshall Allen on sax. Second on the bill will be former Fela Kuti drum titan Tony Allen with his hard-swinging tribute to Art Blakey, while Zara McFarlane will get things moving with her stirring take on Jamaican jazz.

There's also a strong European strand that includes a quadruple summit of solo pianists in the form of Alexander Hawkins, Kaja Draksler, Bojan Z and Giovanni Guidi, plus tech-obsessed piano trio Tin Men and the Telephone. The Saturday line-up begins with a family show from Tin Men, and continues with food critic and jazz pianist Jay Rayner presenting an array of jazz 'chops' with his 'Afternoon of Food and Agony' show. Further European sounds come from esteemed Estonian artists Kadri Voorand Quartet, The Tormis Project and Heavy Beauty, who showcase their country's rich and varied jazz scene as part of celebrations marking 100 years of their nation.

English jazz vocal grand dame Norma Winstone also appears in a rarefied duo with acclaimed US guitarist Ralph Towner, while there are contrasting sets from two veteran horn heroes with trad trombone master Chris Barber leading his celebrated Big Band and former JBs legend Maceo Parker will be lining-up with UK soul-jazz diva Ruby Turner. There's also a key performance from highly respected US jazz singer Sheila Jordan in what will be her 90th birthday year. She'll be backed by a trio led by a trio led by pianist/composer Pete Churchill and joined by a string quartet for selected numbers.

Gateshead's reputation for tapping into cutting edge sounds continues with the ever-compelling Norwegian trumpeter Arve Henriksen and his quartet Jan Bang, Erik Honore and Eivind Aarset, while adventurous Leeds-based guitarist Chris Sharkey premieres his new project, The Orchid and the Wasp, an incendiary duo with rapid-fire improv drummer Mark Sanders. This concert is supported by one of the winners of the 2018 'Jazz North Introduces' award, the all-female trio J Frisco. Further female artists appearing include Issie Barratt's Interchange Dectet, with the likes of Brigitte Beraha, Tori Freestone and Yazz Ahmed among those performing ten newly commissioned pieces.

Mike Flynn

For further details visit www.sagegateshead.com

 TD-Darcy-James-Argue-Solo

There are very few composers now writing world class material for big band, true innovators who are taking the music forward. One of them is Gil Evans' protege Maria Schneider, whose appearance at the London Jazz Festival in 2015 was a major highlight. Another is the Vancouver-born Brooklyn-based bandleader Darcy James Argue. On the face of it their music couldn't be more different. Schneider's Grammy-winning latest release, The Thompson Fields, was inspired by the prairies of Minnesota. Argue's music is typically gritty, urban and angular, all crunchy harmonies and thrashing alt rock grooves.

At Kings Place on Friday night, making his first appearance in the UK since 2010, Argue led his 18-piece Secret Society big band through Real Enemies, a masterpiece of contemporary repertoire, inspired by conspiracy theories and the politics of paranoia and written using an adapted version of Arnold Schoenberg's 12-tone technique, which was once subject to a conspiracy theory of its own. The suite opened with noirish textures, tentative stabs that rippled around the ensemble and darkly luminous harmonies. As the music seesawed between nagging unease and hysterical panic we also heard the first of many atmospheric snippets of recorded speech from the likes of Frank Church, Dick Cheney and JFK.

Across 13-chapters, Real Enemies indulges in all kinds of paranoia, including references to the Red Scare, Area 51 and the Illuminati, and there were ingenious shifts of genre and feel to match the changes of subject matter. Midway through 'Dark Alliance', with the band knee-deep in the squelchy bass of a 1980s hip hop funk groove and the voice of Nancy Reagan pontificating about the evils of drugs, there was a sudden ironic kick to Nicaraguan son. Despite waging a domestic war on narcotics, the Reagan administration famously turned a blind eye to the drug trafficking of their Contra allies, in an effort to stop Nicaragua's Sandinista revolution.

TD-Darcy-James-Argue-Band

The range of different colours and textures Argue gets from the ensemble is astonishing. Throughout the performance pairs of soloists, including tenorist Lucas Pino and guitarist Sebastian Noelle, shared the melodies and drove the narrative along with visceral improvisations. 'Apocalypse In Process', an exploration of doomsday cults, brought weedling pipe organ and frail woodwinds that evoked the sound of early music. And an edgy, pecked motif (the sort of thing that puts you in mind of secret rendezvouses in rainwashed alleyways between men with briefcases and fedoras) regularly reared its head, played by muted trumpets into the open lid of the piano.

There were some huge moments, heralded by screaming alarm calls and ensemble hits that snapped your head back with all the devastating force of an assassin's bullet, but there was reams of subtle ingenuity too. 'The Hidden Hand' featured a stunning passage when syncopated stabs from the band punctuated JFK's 1961 Address before the American Newspaper Publishers Association, in which he talks of a "monolithic and ruthless conspiracy". It's a bravura piece of large ensemble writing that proves just how nimble a big band can be in the right hands.

Real Enemies debuted as a multimedia performance in 2015, which featured a mosaic of video screens and a giant doomsday clock. It was written when President Trump was still just a twinkle in the alt-right's eye. It's an unhappy coincidence that the themes the suite explores are so topical once again. It doesn't need the visuals, but we got a few all the same. When the finale arrived, soloist after soloist piled in until the whole band were on their feet – a ripple effect like the spread of a seductive conspiracy theory. And midway through, as a blazing Carl Maraghi baritone solo melted into spectral ambience, Argue turned to face the audience. Black suited, hair slicked back, face half illuminated and half in shadow, he looked like the leader of his own sinister cult.

The recording of Real Enemies was one of my albums of 2016. I didn't know if I'd ever get to hear it live. It's so profoundly unprofitable and logistically tortuous to run a big band these days, let alone rehearse one and take it on the road, it was a minor miracle to see the Secret Society in the UK. We have to support this music or it will simply disappear. Which is why it was so gutting to see the hall half empty and so heartwarming to see everyone on their feet at the end, applauding furiously. Though Argue is revered by musicians and those in the know, he still doesn't have the public profile he deserves, and it was a late one (10pm start). Still, that can't be the whole story, can it? Why would anyone want to miss this? It's enough to set your mind racing.

– Thomas Rees
– Photos by Tim Dickeson

The first names have been announced for the 22nd edition of the Cheltenham Jazz Festival, which runs from 2 to 7 May 2018, and includes some sizable US jazz talents. Chief among these is revered bassist Christian McBride who will be making a very rare UK appearance with his barnstorming Big Band, as featured on his most recent album, Bringin' It (Mack Avenue). They will be appearing at Cheltenham Town Hall on 6 May.

Another name announced is LA sax star Kamasi Washington, who made a huge impact with his critically acclaimed triple album The Epic, and debuts at Cheltenham with his powerful band. They will be playing their heavy spiritual-jazz fusion at the Big Top on 6 May. Soul-jazz singer Randy Crawford, known for her work with The Crusaders on their hit 'Street Life' and solo hit 'One Day I'll Fly Away', as well as her prolific partnership with their late great keyboardist, Joe Sample, is also set to make her debut appearance at the festival in the Big Top on 2 May. Cheltenham's winning approach to crossover programming, also sees popular blues singer Beth Hart perform at the Big Top on 5 May.

And Jazzwise, who are media partners for the festival, can exclusively announce that former David Bowie saxophonist Donny McCaslin (top left) will be making his only UK date in Spring 2018 at the festival (6 May), while his fellow countryman Jason Moran and his Bandwagon (top right) trio will perform on 5 May. Mercury Prize nominated proggy-jazzers Dinosaur (top centre) are the first among many more UK jazz artists to be announced and are set to appear on 4 May.

The festival takes place in its dedicated 'festival village' in the Spa town's picturesque Montpellier Gardens, where the Big Top and Jazz Arena venues are situated alongside the site's Free Stage, record shop, food stalls and bars, with participating venues including the Town Hall, Parabola Arts Centre (PAC) and The Daffodil, as well as a vibrant fringe line-up and late night events around the town.

– Mike Flynn

More info and tickets visit www.cheltenhamfestivals.com/jazz

"Awesome!'' "That's great!" "Thank you so much". Mike Stern's bonhomie and charm, while signing CDs and trying to respond to 50 people all apparently talking to him at the same time, wasn't only the sign of a generous down-to-earth guy; it also signified that the former Miles Davis/Brecker Brothers guitarist was just delighted to be back on the road. Eighteen months ago he broke both arms badly on the eve of a European tour, after falling in the street in his native New York, while carrying his guitar and gear from his apartment to a waiting taxi. His intended destination of the airport, and a joint tour with saxophonist Bill Evans, turned into the nearest hospital and a long layoff to recover. Such were his injuries that it appeared that this kind of strenuous schedule might never be possible for him again. But despite having to glue his plectrum to his right hand because of nerve damage, Stern was in scintillating form.

Sharing top billing with Stern was revered Chick Corea Elektric Band drummer Dave Weckl, who played with subtlety and thunderous power. He performed a series of duets playing only with his hands, showing a rare dexterity and listening ability as he captured and anticipated Stern and saxophonist Bob Malach's accents and phrases. At this point, bassist Tom Kennedy came to the fore with a Jaco-esque duet of mind-blowing chops, impeccably timed bebop quotes (Dizzy's 'Salt Peanuts', Monk's 'Rhythm-a-Ning') and wah-wah pedal humour. The latter briefly got Stern dancing – showing at least that his hips were still OK. In fact, the band gave off a happy vibe all night, visibly and audibly appreciating each other's work.

Dave-Weckl-IMG 2617

The show had opened with Don Grolnick's 'Nothing Personal' – an adrenalin-fuelled minor blues that goes through the gears. First played by Michael Brecker with Stern on tour in the late 1980s, this was Weckl's more latinised take on the tune. It was also classic Stern solo territory, the guitarist beginning fleet-fingered but subdued, gradually ramping it up until he ripped out wild sustains and power riffs, played so fast and accurately many of the Ronnie's patrons were up on their feet. The brooding funk of 'Avenue B' from his 2004 album, These Times, followed, with plenty of scope for Kennedy's lavish fills, Weckl's pushes and prods and another scorching Stern solo. Malach brought rich tone and melodic contrast often to the latter stages or reprise of tracks, not trying to compete with Stern in the power stakes but altering the soundscape with precise note and phrase choices, plus the odd harmonic screech.

Stern-band-IMG 2418

One surprise was Stern's decision to sing, bringing a Richard Bona-like air to one lilting mid-tempo tune and added emotion to his beautiful new ballad 'I Believe You'. 'Trip', the title track of the new CD – a reference to the fall and his journey of rehab – was peak Stern: intricate, chromatic, fast bebop sax and guitar head, thunderous riffing and volcanic rhythm. And there was an unexpected encore too: Jimi Hendrix's Red House, gutsily sung by Stern with air-ripping guitar breaks. It was an apt choice considering his recent travails: "That's all right baby, I still got my guitar. Look out now ..."

Excellent support was given to the main set by the Laurence Cottle Quartet. Cottle is one of the UK's top bassists with quite a body of composed work for film and TV in addition to virtuosic playing. Here, his group presented inventive and authentic versions of classics like Marcus Miller's 'Maputo' and Herbie Hancock's 'Watermelon Man', but truly took off with a great take on Kenny Garrett's 'Wayne's Thang', with brilliant, humorous interplay between Cottle and the creative, fresh-sounding drummer Frank Tontoh. Would have been great to see the second set.

– Adam McCulloch
Photos by Carl Hyde

Thing

To prise apart the increasingly converging din of his two main projects, Fire! and The ThingMats Gustafsson has loosened the shackles on the latter group's sound. Gone the groove, more space given over to incendiary Ayler-esque ignitions. A bruising take on avant-garde saxophonist Frank Lowe's 'Decision In Paradise' underlines the fresh approach, with Ingebrigt Håker Flaten swapping double-bass for electric, ensnaring a Mephistophelean cardiac arrest in his strings, while drummer extraordinaire Paal Nilssen-Love delivers on his force-of-nature credentials with a bravura exhibition of dexterous gale-force pugilism (those rim-shots pinging like snapped tendons). Throughout, Gustafsson plays the testosterone-fuelled sax terrorist, gurning his way though a catwalk of faux-macho posturing, marking out his territory with coruscating salvos of atavistic calls and wailing hell-bound hollers. But it's not all muscle-flexing, as the trio tease out a mid-set near-tearjerker, the three musicians meditating on a deliciously emotive refrain. Ah, these hooligans have a heart (but we knew that already, right?).

– Spencer Grady

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