This year's EFG London Jazz Festival, which runs from 16 to 25 November at venues across the capital, is starting to shape up with many newly confirmed headliners announced. Those already revealed in the April issue of Jazzwise, who are media partners for the festival, include dazzling vocalist Bobby McFerrin who will be joined by his ground-breaking a cappella 12-piece Voicestra, for a performance of his Circlesongs, which allows for spontaneously improvised sections from choir and audience (Barbican, 18 Nov).

Also added is jazz singer/actress/comedienne – and star of Netflix hit Orange is the New BlackLea DeLaria (Bridge Theatre, 18 Nov); ECM-signed Albanian singer Elina Duni appears in a duo with acclaimed guitarist Rob Luft (Clapham Omnibus, 18 Nov) and popular South Korean jazz singer Youn Sun Nah (above centre) will perform at the newly re-opened Queen Elizabeth Hall (QEH, 20 Nov). The same venue hosts leading UK vibes virtuoso Orphy Robinson's (pictured top left)  reworking of Van Morrison's totemic Astral Weeks, featuring a strong line-up of UK musicians including guitarist John Etheridge plus guest vocalists Zara McFarlane and Sarah Jane Morris (QEH, 19 Nov).

Loose Tubes' flautist Eddie Parker brings his 12-piece Debussy Mirrored Ensemble to the festival with singers Brigitte Beraha and James Gilchrist, in a jazz take on the composer's music in his centenary year (Purcell Room, 20 Nov). Distinctive US improvising pianist Myra Melford (above right) makes an overdue return to the UK with a top-notch band of trumpeter Ron Miles, guitarist Liberty Ellman, bassist Stomu Takeishi and drummer Gerald Cleaver, playing music from her Snowy Egret album (Purcell Room, 23 Nov); while drummer Richard Pite's Jazz Repertory Company dive into pre- and early-jazz history with their show The World Gone Mad – 1899-1919 Jass, Ragtime, Tin Pan Alley and the Blues (Cadogan Hall, 24 Nov).

This year also heralds the start of a new partnership between the festival and the BBC Young Jazz Musician, with the 2018 final hosted at the Queen Elizabeth Hall on the closing Saturday (QEH,24 Nov). Further shows and venues confirmed are: Jazz Voice (RFH, 16 Nov); Tord Gustavsen Trio (Cadogan Hall, 16 Nov); Bill Laurance and the WDR Big Band (QEH, 25 Nov) and Madeleine PeyrouxAnthem tour (RFH, 24 Nov).

Mike Flynn

For full details and tickets visit www.efglondonjazzfestival.org.uk

Darryl-Jones-484-4x6

The last weekend of the 15th Portland Jazz Festival was a feast of jazz-rock/funk fusion, outstanding trumpets, guitars and piano jazz. Pianist Marcus Roberts' trio with nimble drummer Jason Marsalis opened a double bill opposite Russell Malone's trio at the Newmark Theater. Roberts is a classically infused player and the first recipient of the Monk piano prize; he's impressed but failed to move me in the past with scholarly surveys of vintage jazz. After flights through the canon, including Monk (Blues Five Spot), Coltrane (Bessie's Blues) and Mingus (a romp through Haitian Fight Song including deft eights with Marsalis), it was his gossamer Naima, with its impressionistic flurries and emphasis on feeling over flash that won over.

Wearing a quizzical countenance, Malone scoured the audience as if figuring out who on earth they were. Despite introductory encomiums – quotes from Kurt Rosenwinkel about his smooth and connected concept – the guitarist phrased like a horn player who tongues, pecking notes like Sonny Rollins. His technique has subtleties amid the bravura and he can flip 180-degrees from mainstream machismo to delicate soliloquy. Such was the case with 'By the Time I Get to Phoenix', which Malone dedicated to boyhood hero Glen Campbell. The guitarist parsed Hank Marvin sans tremelo arm, bending the strings outrageously. During 'Lost in the Stars' Malone's micro tapping mimicked the firmament falling through God's fingers.

Malone announced the last tune when someone shouted "play some blues!" "Be careful what you say," he cautioned, "I'm from Georgia!" At that the band of Luke Sellick, Rick Germanson and Willie Jones III, launched into a filthy slow blues, the leader crossing the Delta via Jimmy Reed and Chuck Berry.

Later at the Winningstad Theater, enigmatic organist Dr Lonnie Smith commenced with his trademark slow build alongside Jonathans Kriesberg and Blake. Smith, 76, notwithstanding the whirring horns of the Leslie speaker, embraces technology: juxtaposing Hammond swells with laptop and samples of strings and Harmon-muted trumpet. The Miles-like gravitas of his horn simulation incorporates grace notes and tonal niceties, and with it he transcends the role of organ grinder. The exoticism of 'Alhambra', featured on his latest live release All in My Mind (Blue Note) owed a debt to Gil Evans' Sketches of Spain with its Korg-generated orchestral sweep. Few entertainers beguile, phantom of the opera-like, better than the Buffalo-born B3 boss. Gorgeously eloquent, Kreisberg sketched Paul Simon's 'Fitty (sic) Ways to Leave Your Lover,' ignited by Blake's lean second line beats and purring snare.

Rachel-Flowers-4x6-5431

Classic Pianos, next door to the legendary Aladdin Theatre is a choice venue and it must have been a treat for multi-instrumentalist Rachel Flowers (above) to tickle a nine-foot Bösendorfer concert grand. Flowers, 23, also adeptly plays flute, guitar, Chapman Stick, ukulele – pretty much any instrument she touches. During a pre-show interview with festival director Don Lucoff, she enthused about guitar jams with Dweezil Zappa and her passion for the prog rock of Greg Lake. Other crushes included Rachmaninov, Kendrick Lamar and the Allman Brothers. Flowers was born fifteen weeks premature that led to blindness at three months; she's absorbed every sound around from her early get-go, much of it disarmingly retro. A fascination with Spinal Tap, a mockumentary released a decade before her birth, inspired 'Goes to Eleven', which features on the sweeping sampler of her talents Listen (2016). One composition was called 'Can't Stand Still' and Flowers hammered out 'Goes to Eleven' with apparent abandon tethered to precision. 'In the Middle of The Night' revealed that her mind rarely rests; after each focussed performance Flowers giggled, rocking back and forth ecstatically. There's scarcely a filter between her imagination and it's outpour but Flowers' expansiveness may prove hard to harness in a world where success is too often defined by stylistic restrictions.

Etienne-Charles-and-Antoine-Roney-440-4x6

The legacy of Miles Davis still looms large yet there didn't seem an excess of tributes on his 90th in 2016. His gregarious nephew Vince Wilburn Jnr has kept the flame high with an all-star Miles Electric Band, even with shifting personnel. He, stereo pianists John Beasely and Baabe Irving III, tabla master Debasish Chaudhuri, veteran percussionist Munyungo Jackson, Trinidadian trumpeter Etienne Charles and saxophonist Antoine Roney (above) convened at Revolution Hall. Intense, progressive guitarist David Gilmore stood in for sometime member Blackbyrd McKnight, or perhaps more appositely style-wise, Miles alum Mike Stern.

Anchoring the fun was moonlighting Rolling Stone Darryl 'The Munch' Jones (pictured top), who dropped those deep spongy basslines from Decoy and You're Under Arrest. It was Baabe Irving who nursed Miles back into the fray in the 1980s with The Man With the Horn and those synth stabs and galactic textures were instantly recognisable. When he'd be skeletal, Beasley would funk out on Rhodes stage right, then the spotlight would flip back to Irving who sketched 'Nerfertiti' and 'Seven Steps to Heaven', dusting Bill Evans' harmonies with arch nostalgia. The enveloping wallop of Joe Zawinul's anthemic riff from 'In A Silent Way' buoyed Roney's soprano and, sartorially snappy, Charles shot out volleys of chromaticism. Solo, Jones heralded the inevitable Jean Pierre but before that Jackson joined Chaudhuri front of stage for a cajón/tabla drum-off (pictured below). Badal Roy was the Indian percussionist most associated with Miles amidst his 1970s fusion along with Mtume, later Mino Cinelu, but Jackson and Chaudhuri were no disappointment. Jackson earlier announced 'dinner time!' with a triangle chime (then demonstrated how integral that humble item can be) and regaled with a chekere masterclass.

Munyungo-Jackson-Debasish-Chaudhuri-345-4x6

The MEB crowd was decent but the house for Snarky Puppy, an octet comparable in instrumentation and ethos, was sardine-like at Roseland Theater. Soul'd Out Music were the joint presenters and for those who can't spell they weren't kidding, you couldn't swing a cat in the joint, let alone a pissed off canine.

Regrettably a concert clash didn't allow absorption of much beyond Cory Henry's protracted synth melisma before belting to the Winningstad for Charles Tolliver and New Music Inc. I recalled the veteran trumpeter/arranger's take-no-prisoners orchestra at the 2007 IAJE, commemorated on the explosive With Love (Blue Note, 2006). The quartet in Portland was a different story. Attended by a sparse but hardcore following, bassist Devin Starks seemed diffident and guitarist John Thomas was slow to sift through his sheaf of charts. The leader, without music, waited for Thomas to settle; somehow he'd know when his fellow beret-sporting cohort was ready and then the music would kick in. Flavourful Tolliver originals made the bulk, save for a reprisal of Round Midnight (featured on With Love) and a raggedy take on Neil Hefti's 'Repetition,' popularized by Charlie Parker. Tolliver relishes a rough'n'ready, thriving on risk, though my ears were feeling bourgeois and eager for poised, less obtuse noteplay.

The following afternoon seamless mastery over challenging material (be careful what you wish for), was presented by charming guitarist Yotam Silberstein, who navigated serpentine Brazilian and Argentinean melodies, including Carlos Aguirre's 'Milonga Gris' and Jaco do Bandolim's 'O Vôo da mosca' (both feature on his superb quartet date The Village). Local hero Dan Balmer, himself an excellent guitarist, opened with funky organ combo Trio Subtonic and the Portland team seemed set to give the 36-year-old from Tel Aviv a run for his money. However the headliner brought his A game to the informal Mississippi Studios, a relaxed bar in Portland's historical district. Silberstein's quartet featured gangly Israeli drummer Daniel Dor, bassist Dave Robaire and the brilliant accordionist/pianist from Rio, Vitor Gonçalves, known for associations with Hermeto Pascoal and Maria Bethânia. Silberstein and Gonçalves played incredible duos together and the band had a blast negotiating Pixinguinha's fiendish soccer choro 'Um a zero.' Silberstein's fluid technique and dexterity are clearly his suit but his compositions reveal a reflective side, including the Blade Runner-esque 'Night Walk' inspired by after hours strolls in Tokyo.

More youthful virility was salient at Revolution Hall for the the final bill as 17-year-old drummer Domo Branch fronted his fiery 'Domo's Delight' featuring mentor Devin Phillips on tenor. Branch may have been the youngest in the band but the tight quintet recalled an incarnation of elder Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers.

In contrast, Javon Jackson, a past Messenger himself (1987-90), had nothing to prove since he had a red-eye to catch. Still looking much as he did in his Blakey heyday, Jackson, 52, helmed a veteran supergroup 'Jazz by 5', and demonstrated accrued wisdom with chiselled soloing, deploying false fingerings and split tones redolent of George Coleman. A Berklee college alumnus, Jackson cracked to pianist Joanne Brackeen (longtime faculty there), 'Berklee, that's where they teach triads isn't it?' Lanky Brackeen, in polka dot shirt, stripy socks and spangly gold sneakers looked brittle but played anything but, generating maximum applause with her rambunctious, investigative intelligence. Randy Brecker's gleaming tone telegraphed Miles-isms too, since the group embraced 'So What', 'Freddie the Freeloader' and 'Flamenco Sketches'. Was the setlist deferring to Jimmy Cobb, a cornerstone of Kind of Blue 60 years prior? A feisty drum feature on 'My Shining Hour' proved any Cobb concessions entirely unnecessary. These sagacious legends, including Eddie Gomez, may have shared some grey hair, but there their ability to iron wrinkles out of dyed-in-wool material was indubitable. A defiant climax to this savvy, smartly programmed festival, and Jazzwise caught only a fraction of the action.

Story and photos – Michael Jackson

Concert venue Turner Sims Southampton, which is part of the University of Southampton, will receive over £315,000 from Arts Council England to launch Jazz South, a three-year talent development programme.

The only music project in the country selected within the final round of the ACE's Ambition for Excellence programme fund, the Jazz South initiative seeks to "significantly raise the aspirations of emerging and professional jazz artists, standards of performance, composition and promotion" for jazz musicians based in southern England. The scheme aims to work with established and emerging artists, as well as talented children and young people. It will also engage with promoters and leading UK and international jazz figures. New work will be commissioned, with talent developed through music masterclasses and artist residencies.

The funding further enhances Turner Sims' reputation for programming imaginative and high-profile artists across jazz, folk, avant-garde and classical music. Kevin Appleby, Turner Sims Concert Hall Manager, said of the award: "This is a hugely exciting moment for Turner Sims and I'm most grateful to Arts Council England for their support. This investment enables us to realise our aspirations for creating new opportunities for the jazz sector in the south of England. I know from the conversations we have had with a range of organisations and individuals across the region already that there is a great appetite for this, and I look forward to working with partners regionally, nationally and internationally to bring these opportunities to life."

– Mike Flynn

– Photo by Tom Askew-Miller (Binker & Moses with Evan Parker and Byron Wallen at Turner Sims)

For more info visit www.turnersims.co.uk

evan-p-live

Returning to the place of their 2012 debut performance and live recording, Rocket Science took the audience on a wild and captivating journey at the Vortex on Friday. Mavericks of their instruments, saxophonist Evan Parker, trumpeter Peter Evans and electronics musician Sam Pluta (this time performing without pianist Craig Taborn) are remarkable in their progressive approach to testing and expanding the limits of musical convention. The concert was an explosion of radical sound and sonic manipulation: voluminous, spatial passages juxtaposed ferocious explorations of range, dynamic and timbre with delicate melody and well-placed squeaks, fluttering, slapping, breathing and whistling.

This was decidedly free music, but the trio were wonderfully simpatico, entering new movements and ideas with collective precision. Sensations were captured in split seconds, as textural and melodic concepts developed, overlapped and bounced between players. Pluta's electronic improvisation added a mind-bending dimension to the concert. At moments it was fierce and pointed; at more subtle times it was impossible to know where the acoustic ended and electronic began. These magic moments of real-time manipulation allowed Parker to dance and interweave with his own sounds, and one cacophonous passage evoked sensations of auditory illusions, rather than live electro-acoustic creation. Peter Evans' performance was particularly spellbinding. He captivated the eyes and ears as he appeared to transcend the realms of his instrument, transforming it from roaring motorbike to the delicate source of a sweetly whistled melody. Spanning range, tone, timbre and emotion he abandoned any preconceptions of conventional trumpet playing. Evans' sounds are so precise and refined that his 'extended technique' no longer seems unusual, but a logical means of expressive communication. 

Of course, this boundary-pushing isn't to everyone's taste, and such sonic unorthodoxy can be a challenge to the more squeamish listener. The audience at The Vortex, though, appeared enthralled by the journey, from frantic fervour to floating through a space strewn with crunchy electronic meteoroids. By the end my heart was racing along with the on-stage energy. The beauty of these fresh, free sounds is that they break through the rules and confinements of habitual listening experiences. These are exciting (and potentially uncomfortable) because they are otherwise unexpressed: because they go beyond familiar vocabulary. At the end of Rocket Science's set, the friend beside me glanced at the pen and paper grasped between my fingers, and joked: "Did you get all that down?" No. Not at all.

– Celeste Cantor-Stephens

Multi-award winning saxophonist and composer Phil Meadows hits the road for a string of UK dates in March and April in the run up to recording his next studio album. Meadows has a formidable reputation as an innovative composer via his own Project band, as well as his work with versatile string ensemble Engines Orchestra, who've recently performed ambitious collaborations with Phronesis and guitarist Femi Temowo.

The latest forward-thinking configuration of the Phil Meadows Project now includes guitarist Michael De Souza (from the band Big Bad Wolf), drummer Jay Davis and bassist Joe Downard, who all combine on a widescreen sound palette. This includes electronica-influenced grooves akin to trip-hop kingpins Bonobo, plus hook-laden melodies and spacious soundscapes, all of which will be further enhanced on the up-coming album by electronic artist Nick Tyson and producer Mikko Gordon.

Catch the band on tour (which is supported by Arts Council England) at the following dates: Pizza Express Jazz Club Soho, London (12 March); The Lescar, Sheffield (14 March); Matt and Phred's, Manchester (15 March); JATP, Bradford (16 March); Ronnie Scott's, London (Late Show, 4 April) and The Storey, Lancaster (13 April).

Mike Flynn

For more info visit www.philmeadowsmusic.co.uk

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website

If you do not change browser settings, you consent to continue. Learn more

I understand

Breaking News

Jazz Women celebrated at Jazz Centre UK exhibition

Jazz Women celebrated at Jazz Centre UK …

Southend-on-Sea's Jazz Centre UK presents a major exhibition, Jazz Women...

Read More.....
Boggamasta boogie on down at Brussels Jazz Weekend

Boggamasta boogie on down at Brussels Ja…

The UK equivalent to the Brussels Jazz Weekend would be...

Read More.....
Orphy Robinson gets Gibraltar rocking beyond Borders

Orphy Robinson gets Gibraltar rocking be…

British vibes virtuoso Orphy Robinson is artist-in-residence at the year's...

Read More.....
Vijay Iyer Sextet and Julian Lage jive to Jazz Cafe

Vijay Iyer Sextet and Julian Lage jive t…

Having reopened its doors in January 2016, following a multi-million-pound...

Read More.....
Jon Hiseman 1944-2018

Jon Hiseman 1944-2018

One of the UK's foremost drummers and bandleaders, Jon Hiseman...

Read More.....
Airto Moreira's Afro-Samba Anthems Raise Roof At Ronnie's

Airto Moreira's Afro-Samba Anthems Raise…

  No greater sign of changing times comes than in this...

Read More.....
Ayanna Witter-Johnson and Binker & Moses head to Harrogate

Ayanna Witter-Johnson and Binker & M…

The Harrogate International Festival, which has been running for over...

Read More.....
Voting Now Open for 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

Voting Now Open for 2018 Parliamentary J…

Voting is now open for the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards...

Read More.....
Lost John Coltrane Quartet Album surfaces on Impulse!

Lost John Coltrane Quartet Album surface…

A previously unreleased session by the classic John Coltrane Quartet...

Read More.....
Etienne Charles Triumphant At The Tabernacle With Timely Blend Of Defiance And Celebration

Etienne Charles Triumphant At The Tabern…

  This venue has deep historical resonance for black music in...

Read More.....
Jean Toussaint All-Star 6Tet Shine Bright At Ronnie Scott's

Jean Toussaint All-Star 6Tet Shine Brigh…

  'All-star' is a term mostly out of fashion these days...

Read More.....
Horn Doyenne Holsen Hones Minimalist Drones For Hubro Album Launch

Horn Doyenne Holsen Hones Minimalist Dro…

The Norwegian brass-band tradition, which first evolved in that country...

Read More.....
Vandermark and Nilssen-Love Blow Down Brighton's Green Door

Vandermark and Nilssen-Love Blow Down Br…

  The streets of Brighton have been overflowing with music fans...

Read More.....
Tully Takes The Prize To Ronnie's

Tully Takes The Prize To Ronnie's

  What better way to celebrate the conferring of an honour...

Read More.....
Rebirth Of The Cool: Shabaka Hutchings, Thundercat and Nubya Garcia lead a jazz takeover at Field Day

Rebirth Of The Cool: Shabaka Hutchings, …

  After years of going to jazz gigs and being the...

Read More.....
Anthony Braxton's ZIM Sextet go exploring at Cafe OTO

Anthony Braxton's ZIM Sextet go explorin…

  With the death of Cecil Taylor a few weeks ago...

Read More.....
New British Jazz Generation Blasts Bath With Spiritual Baptism

New British Jazz Generation Blasts Bath …

Bath Festival applied radical surgery to their roster of festivals in...

Read More.....
PYJAEN Prosper At Peckham's Ghost Notes

PYJAEN Prosper At Peckham's Ghost Notes

Catching bands at the beginning of their journeys is so often...

Read More.....
Sons of Kemet, Ashley Henry and Yussef Dayes groove at the Great Escape

Sons of Kemet, Ashley Henry and Yussef D…

Since its beginnings in 2006, Brighton's festival of new music...

Read More.....
Zara McFarlane and Jazzmeia Horn among highlights at St Lucia Jazz Fest

Zara McFarlane and Jazzmeia Horn among h…

In recent times this event has had a tenuous relationship...

Read More.....
Rainforest Reveries: Crawford and Simcock In Arboreal Praise For Powys As Birdsongs Take Flight At Hampstead Arts Fest

Rainforest Reveries: Crawford and Simcoc…

Released last month on Basho Records, Birdsong/Cân yr Adar fuses...

Read More.....
Claire Martin, The Printmakers and Jamie Cullum line-up for 606 Club 30 years at Lots Road Festival

Claire Martin, The Printmakers and Jamie…

Chelsea's salubrious jazz den, the 606 Club, is to mark...

Read More.....
Collective X line-up for Love & Protest at Stratford Circus

Collective X line-up for Love & Prot…

Genre-defying London-based group Collective X, led by singer Alya Al...

Read More.....
Love Supreme summit at London's Roundhouse

Love Supreme summit at London's Roundhou…

A blazing afternoon sun, beer-drinking crowds, and smooth electronic beats...

Read More.....
The Lage Lund Trio, Julia Hülsmann and Christopher Dell inspire at Jazzfest Bonn

The Lage Lund Trio, Julia Hülsmann and C…

During its unlikely spell as the post-war capital of West...

Read More.....
Stanley Clarke, Dave Douglas and Avishai Cohen heat up EFG London Jazz Festival

Stanley Clarke, Dave Douglas and Avishai…

The line-up for this year's EFG London Jazz Festival, which...

Read More.....
Breakin' Convention raise roof with jazz-indebted dance riot at Sadler's Wells

Breakin' Convention raise roof with jazz…

  Founded in 2004 by 'choreopoet' Jonzi D and still curated...

Read More.....
Bärtsch's Mobile Go Minimal Amid Homegrown Diamonds At Estonian Summit

Bärtsch's Mobile Go Minimal Amid Homegro…

  Every music festival has its logistical problems – from gremlins...

Read More.....
Courtney, Kamasi, Frisell and Sheppard thrill the flock as VEIN hits rich seam at Cheltenham

Courtney, Kamasi, Frisell and Sheppard t…

It's a small town, Cheltenham, and the jazz festival is...

Read More.....
WorldService Project's propulsive politics mix punk and Python for satirical japes at Jazz In The Round

WorldService Project's propulsive politi…

"Five disillusioned anti-Brexit punk soldiers...", is how Dave Morecroft, commander-in-chief...

Read More.....
EST Symphony and Akinmusire energise and engage at Espoo's April Jazz

EST Symphony and Akinmusire energise and…

It's 10 years since Esbjörn Svensson's death on 14 June...

Read More.....
Ray Blue Rings True With Pan-Atlantic Quartet At Pizza

Ray Blue Rings True With Pan-Atlantic Qu…

  What better way to celebrate International Jazz Day than with...

Read More.....
Tom Ibarra, Stoney Lane Records store and Family shows complete Cheltenham Jazz Fest line-up

Tom Ibarra, Stoney Lane Records store an…

The doors are almost open for this year's edition of...

Read More.....
Esperanza and Nubya energises while Dame Cleo mesmerises at Jazz FM Awards

Esperanza and Nubya energises while Dame…

  Last year's Jazz FM awards was a memorable occasion, with...

Read More.....
Pat Metheny, Ezra Collective, Esperanza and Nubya Garcia among winners at fifth Jazz FM Awards

Pat Metheny, Ezra Collective, Esperanza …

The winners of this year's Jazz FM Awards were announced...

Read More.....
OFFBEAT Jazz and Cinema Fest goes French

OFFBEAT Jazz and Cinema Fest goes French

A new weekend-long jazz on film event, the OFFBEAT Jazz...

Read More.....


Subcribe To Jazzwise

Advertisement

Call 0800 137201 to subscribe or click here to email the subscriptions team

Get in touch

Jazzwise Magazine,
St. Judes Church,
Dulwich Road, 
Herne Hill,
London, SE24 0PD.

0208 677 0012

Latest Tweets

@John_BHarvey especially when he keeps mouthing "puta" at you for not crumbling at his stopovers. let's hope he runs into Pepe or Godin
Follow Us - @Jazzwise
@blackfaurest @highaurad @dragcityrecords great axes axis
Follow Us - @Jazzwise

Newsletter

© 2016 MA Business & Leisure Ltd registered in England and Wales number 02923699 Registered office: Jesses Farm, Snow Hill, Dinton, Salisbury, SP3 5HN . Designed By SE24 MEDIA