The twin tenors tradition has a long history, stretching back to the cutting contests of Dexter Gordon and Wardell Gray and frequently revived by promoters with an eye to cashing in on the swaggering, macho appeal of the format. Twin tenors in a quartet, with no harmony instrument and only bass and drums backing, requires a collaborative rather than competitive mindset – tonight's gig is an object lesson in how two high-output creative minds can operate in the same sonic bailiwick without getting in each other's way.

'Hitchcock and Barford' may sound like the name of a respectably conservative gent's outfitters, but this is adventurous, risk-taking music. With no chordal instrument to tie them down, the twin frontliners are free to roam at will, pushing hard against the shifting rhythmic and harmonic boundaries sketched out by the endlessly creative team of Fergus Ireland on bass and James Maddren on drums – the latter's presence in a project seems increasingly to guarantee that something unusual will be going down. Both frontmen look so similar on the Verdict's dimly lit stage that the phrase 'twin tenors' might almost be taken literally, especially as they both seem to patronise the same optician, but when they take off to solo on a deconstruction of Jimmy Heath's 'CTA' the differences are as striking as the similarities. Hitchcock has the softer, more romantic tone – he moves effortlessly in and out of lightning fast, double-time runs, up into the highest register and out again, breaking the flow with short twisting phrases against the beat, reminiscent of, but not beholden to, the style of Mark Turner; Barford's tone is flintier, more unyielding, projecting out into the room; he slips between bop language and modernist abstraction like a true polyglot, his timing and phrasing always impeccable. It's a fascinating echo of the tough/tender tenor dichotomy that stretches back to Rollins/Coltrane, Young/Hawkins and beyond.

HitchBar LWorms 4

There are a number of questingly melodic originals by Hitchcock (above left) - 'A38' features the kind of loose-limbed polyrhythmic backbeat that Maddren specialises in underneath a striking, declamatory melody – and one by Barford (above) – 'The Highly Strung Trapeze Artist' – more austere, but no less rewarding, by contrast. Fergus Ireland on bass contributes a ballad suggestion – Nat Coles' 'Beautiful Moons Ago' – and his playing throughout illustrates why he's so in demand; with a simply awesome if unorthodox technique put in the service of a powerfully individual musical imagination, simultaneously grounding the harmony and sending it into unexpected directions, he's an inexhaustible creative powerhouse. 'Blues For JC' makes the expected venture into Ornette-ish territory, but what's striking about this band is the level of relaxed, good-humoured communication that's present to temper the tropes of the avante-garde – there'a a warm, inclusive spirit at work that doesn't compromise the fierce artistic vision, but permits a mellow, reverent reading of 'This I Dig Of You' that captures the lightness of the original, and a beautiful closing take on 'My Ideal'. Hitchock is busy leading his own band, and Barford has recently been in Real World Studios recording with Iain Ballamy in producer's chair, but let's hope that they both find time to reconvene this project in the studio some time soon.

– Eddie Myer

 – Photos by Lisa Wormsley

Jazzwise received this statement from Trudy Lister of Tomorrow's Warriors this morning regarding award-winning bassist Gary Crosby:

"Gary Crosby OBE, Artistic Director of Tomorrow's Warriors and Jazz Jamaica suffered a stroke on Monday 29 January just a few days after celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Gary is in his local hospital after being seen by the team in the Hyper-Acute Stroke Unit in A&E (one of only eight such units in the whole of London) and within about an hour of arriving at the hospital, Gary was admitted to the Stroke Unit Ward.

Janine Irons MBE, Gary's partner and Managing Director of Tomorrow's Warriors said; "I can't express how grateful we are to the paramedics for getting us to the unit so promptly. The good news is: we caught the stroke early enough to avoid too much damage to the brain, and the medics expect Gary to make a full recovery within 4-6 weeks, provided he does his physio exercises and takes proper rest, and we'll be doing all we can to help him do just that.

Of course, this means we've had to clear Gary's diary for the whole of February and are having to think carefully about any dates in March, but time will tell. As far as our sessions at Southbank Centre and Rich Mix are concerned, we've pretty much got everything covered, as all members of the Tomorrow's Warriors team have stepped up to lend support.

Meantime, Gary has started a course of physiotherapy and, according to the Stroke Team, is making excellent progress. So we're reassured that, despite the shocking news, Gary is on the mend, in good hands, and confident he'll be back on his bass, cracking his old jokes, and putting our young musicians through their paces again very soon. Gary and I extend our warm thanks to all our family, friends, supporters and colleagues for their support and understanding at this challenging time."
Trudy Lister

Jazzwise wishes Gary a speedy recovery and a return to full strength.

For more info on Tomorrow's Warriors visit www.tomorrowswarriors.org

Brotherhood LWorms 12

Last week saw the highly successful South Coast Jazz Festival at Ropetackle, Shoreham-on-Sea and full credit must go to the team of director Phil Jackson, Claire Martin, Elaine Crouch and Julian Nicholas for organising such a wide range of jazz events and performances throughout the week. Thursday and Friday drew interesting comparisons between rising stars and well-established figures.

Clark Tracey, an increasingly important catalyst in the development of young musicians, presented his latest quintet in the context of an evening entitled Bebop & Beyond. Often overlooked in these days of modal and ambient jazz, bebop retains its freshness and urgency and the quintet handled it with great assurance, both in terms of adhering to the tight arrangements and in solos which demonstrated a high degree of technique and invention. A solid programme included 'Hot House', 'Groovin' High', 'Anthropology' and 'A Night in Tunisia', giving all the members opportunity to show their capabilities, and on 'Minority' trumpeter Alexandra Ridout's clear tone and the expressive alto of Sean Payne brought to mind the definitive 1953 rendition by Clifford Brown and composer Gigi Gryce. All the time Clark drove the rhythm section in customary fashion, eliciting solid contributions from pianist Elliott Sansom and bassist James Owston, who showed a prodigious mastery of his instrument. A group of youngsters well worth looking out for.

alexandra-ridout-southcoast

In contrast, Friday saw musicians with a wealth of experience gathered in a tribute to Chris McGregor's Brotherhood of Breath. Kevin Le Gendre's Q&A session before the performance explored the legacy, inspiration and continued relevance – musically, socially and politically – of the music, drawing on the knowledge and experience of members of the band, and the presenter introduced Hazel Miller and Barbara Pukwana, who were in the audience; two figures so important in the creation of the Brotherhood and the subsequent Dedication Orchestra. 

The music that followed was suitably joyful, evoking the spirit of the Brotherhood, with its mixture of township jazz and improvisation. Many of the numbers came from the album Country Cooking – 'Sejui'; 'Dakar'; 'Big G' (dedicated to George Lee); 'Sweet as Honey' (or 'Harry' – in memory of the late Harry Beckett); and 'Country Cooking' itself. Several of those who appeared on the 1988 recording were present – saxophonist/bassoonist Robert Juriz, trumpeters Dave De Fries and Claude Deppa, and trombonists Fyass Virji and Annie Whitehead, whose solo on the title number showed what an exciting player she is. A plunger growl developed into an array of slurs, slides, trills and glissandos; rasping then a velvet burr. The full works, rich in texture and warmth.

Another highlight was the arrangement of 'Seabreeze', with tenor saxophonist Frank Williams taking front stage and soloing with strength and lyricism, soaring above a bedrock of riffing brass and reeds. Uplifting throughout, the musicians nudged and encouraged each other in their solos, loosening things up, then reining in with the strong gravitational pull of the rhythm section. This was a heartfelt tribute to one of the most influential modern bands in jazz and the obvious infectious enjoyment and rapport of the musicians was met with rapturous applause and appreciation by the capacity audience.

– Matthew Wright
– Photos by Lisa Wormsley 

 Uri-Caine-Brussels1

One of the Brussels Jazz Festival's best gigs came three days before the end of its 10-day run. The Stateside pianist Uri Caine was commissioned to write a new work for the Brussels Philharmonic, and it was given its world premiere in venue Flagey's concert hall-sized Studio 4. During the first half, Caine revisited his 2001 'Diabelli Variations For Chamber Orchestra And Improvised Piano Solo', tweaking the legendary pieces by Ludwig Van Beethoven. The Philharmonic's core parts weren't noticeably revolutionary, but the tension revolved around Caine's almost continual jazz flow, as his elaborations created a huge playpen for spontaneous development.

The key points of pause and change were when he locked eyes with conductor Alexander Hanson, each agreeing on the next structural passage. Caine subversively introduced ragtime matter, even stepping boldly, right into the boogie-woogie realm. It was a striking new ingredient, this unpredictability, as he wove in and out of time with the orchestral flow, a scampering renegade, invoking the spirit of Danny Kaye. At one stage Caine ran through a sequence of lone plinks, isolated handclaps and a loud "atishoo", and then we were considering the legacy of Harpo Marx. This is not to suggest any comedic dominance: Caine's virtuosity is serious, but anything goes, as he makes contained flashes, flighty thwips and repeatedly runs his fingers from left to right, in time with the orchestral swells. Was that a snatch of a Looney Tunes cartoon theme there? Or a moment of Thelonious Monk or Fats Waller? Then some Cecil Taylor-Stockhausen hybrid? Caine might have been mocking the tradition, on one level, but he was also investing an over-familiar great work with a fresh sideways glance, his virtuosity perhaps not so radically unpredictable for the seasoned jazzer, but still generally ear-opening.

Uri-Caine-Brussels2

Following the intermission, Caine presented the world premiere of 'Agent Orange', for an even bigger orchestra, with three extensive percussion spreads to the rear, a harp and four French horns amongst the expansions. The composer was also joined by Dave Liebman (soprano saxophone), John Hébert (bass) and DJ Olive (turntables). Now there was no past baggage, as all the floodgates were open for a state-of-now barrage of complexity, dynamism, contrast and a natural welding of multiple forms. Caine was in a Romantic Zorn state, but with a Varèse-then-Zappa lineage, utilising the orchestral forces in massively confident fashion, sometimes even harking back to Carl Nielsen, or heading out across a John Ford cowboy prairie. There was a gripping surfeit of hyper-action, with recurring Liebman rebel-Gershwin tendrils, winding between the big orchestral blooms, as Olive gently scratched out slurred vocal vinyl, or made cosmic electronic bloops. Hébert's groaning bass stood out from the crowd, as we appreciated the perfect sonic balance between these massed elements. Caine himself was in an almost permanent soloing mode, but also vaguely subsumed for much of the time. Nearing the climax, 'Dixie' was fed into the chaos, and the orchestra shouted out "No! No! No!", as Caine's gloriously ambitious work exploded with an ultimate dynamic, surely anti-Trumpian excess. Long known for reconfiguring classic works by hallowed composers, it's as if Caine has fed all of this cumulative experience into his own monumentally elaborate, personal distillery.

– Martin Longley
– Photos by Michel van Rhijn

Nubya-WeOutHere-1351

Like all the best creative scenes, London's emergent and youthful jazz-based soundscape is characterised by tight relations between those that perform within it. Drummer Femi Koleoso keeps it grounded: "It's just my friends doing well," he says, in a documentary created for the We Out Here album launch at Total Refreshment Centre.

This latest Brownswood Recordings cut features an array of London-based musicians with a rich musical rapport, developed through years of learning the ropes and growing together. If it does sometimes feel like an extended group of talented friends, it also feels like a dynamic music scene with its own enthralling sound: spiritual jazz mixed with the best of UK club culture, given a broken or Afro-beat twist and performed with infectious energy.

On the second night of the launch run, the crowd were served up a treat by groups Maisha and TriForce, as well as tenor saxophonist Nubya Garcia (pictured top), introduced by the MC as the "empress" (not queen) of the scene. If you're not moving to Maisha's music, you may want to check your pulse. They specialise in frantic, contagiously joyful percussion, but also offer a shimmering spiritual jazz embrace. They're tightly rehearsed as anything, (a theme of the night), regularly pausing on a dime and in sync.

TriForce-WeOutHere-06520

TriForce (guitarist Mansur Brown above) mix a Thundercat feel with Hendrixian pyrotechnics and London street sensibilities: fresh-sounding and, at times, jaw-dropping. Nubya Garcia, a member of Maisha, followed TriForce with her own band to soar through a selection of tracks from her 2017 debut EP, Nubya's 5ive. An extended lead-in to the instantly recognisable 'Lost Kingdoms' proved one of the highlights of the night. What did we do to deserve all this? If you're London-based with an ear for discovery, the energy and sounds that these collectives are producing in a live setting and on record demand your immediate attention. They're out there, catch them as soon as you can.

– James Rybacki // @james_rybacki

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